Close

Beek’s Local Raw Honey

Local, raw honey from our bee geeks (beeks) dedicated to all things honey and hive.

Local, liquid gold from the Golden State. Coming soon.

What is a beek, you ask? A bee geek; someone dedicated to all things honey and hive. In other words, just the sort of beekeepers we needed to make our first batch of local honey. It’s sweet, raw and filled to the brim with local honey from some of our most passionate beekeepers.

All-day sweetness.

From breakfast to dessert, a little bit of Beek’s Honey can make everything taste better.

All Recipes

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Who are the beeks featured on the Beek’s honey bottles?

    By now you know a “beek” is what we affectionately call our bee geeks. But here are some things you might not know about the four beeks currently featured on our Beek’s honey bottles.

    Jim Oakley – El Cajon, Calif. Jim has been a member of the Sioux Honey Association Co-op since 1966. He runs Oakley Honey Farms with his two brothers, Ron and John. When they were kids, their dad Tony – who started the family honey operation – wrapped their hunting dog’s hurt paws in honey and tube socks. Through the healing powers of natural, pure honey, their dog was back on his feet – er, paws – in no time.

    David Bradshaw – Visalia, Calif. A member of the Sioux Honey Association Co-op since 1976, David’s father was an engineer on the Apollo Space Program at NASA before leaving all that behind to be a beekeeper. Today, when David isn’t tending to his hives, he’s engineering new gadgets to help fellow beekeepers, such as a special dolly to lift beehives that he sells on his Bradshaw Honey Farms website.

    Bryan Beekman – Sanger, Calif. Beekman’s Apiaries runs about 10,000 hives in the Fresno County area. Bryan is a third-generation beekeeper, and he has been a member of the Sioux Honey Association Co-op since 2002. Bryan says his key to success as a beekeeper – besides having “beek” in his name – is thinking like a bee and acting like a bee. “I just wish I could fly like a bee,” he says.

    Bob Brandi – Merced, Calif. Bob got into the bee game right out of college in 1973. He now owns Brandi Honey Farms, which includes his two sons and daughter, and operates around 6,000 hives. On average, those hives produce 700,000 pounds of honey a year. In addition to producing honey, his bees also help pollinate his 40 acres of almonds.

  • Why should I buy local honey?

    Though there’s not a ton of research to support it, it’s been said that local honey can help provide allergy relief. The theory being that the bees in your vicinity will collect pollen from the plants that cause allergies. And the honey that those bees produce then acts as a sort of vaccine.

    But more so, we believe it’s important to support your local honey providers. Sioux Honey is proud of each and every one of its 270+ independent beekeepers, and we’re excited to offer products that feature and promote those individuals within their very own communities.

  • How do I substitute honey for sugar?

    When substituting honey for granulated sugar in recipes, begin by substituting honey for up to half of the sugar called for in the recipe. For baked goods, make sure to reduce the oven temperature by 25°F to prevent overbrowning; reduce any liquid called for by 1/4 cup for each cup of honey used and add 1/2 teaspoon baking soda for each cup of honey used. Because of its high fructose content, honey has higher sweetening power than sugar. This means you can use less honey than sugar to achieve the desired sweetness.

Find Your Sweetness Here

Making a grocery run? You can find our honey on most major retailers’ shelves.

Where to Buy

Know What’s New

Enter our monthly giveaway, get exclusive coupons and meet the beekeepers behind our honey when you join HIVE, our digital magazine. It’s full of sweet ideas and sent straight to your inbox.

Join HIVE Today.